Family

Who, Me.

Rob Lloyd

Doctor Who is about to face his greatest challenge: his number one fan.

Rob Lloyd (BBC America’s Doctor Who: Earth Conquest) is putting The Doctor on trial. Is Doctor Who (the television show) guilty of inciting in Rob a debilitating obsession, or has it shaped him into a well-rounded, mentally-sound member of society?

“A great show.” Terrance Dicks (Script Editor of Doctor Who 1969 to 1974)
“A truly funny man.” Katy Manning (Jo Grant. Doctor Who 1971 to 1973)

The Dolls’ House

Rag & Bone Puppet Theatre

A loving family of toys finally get a house of their own. But then they meet Marchpane, a nasty doll who always gets her own way. With live music, a gorgeous, detailed dollhouse, and a video camera that brings the audience in for close-ups. Tottie is a loving little wooden doll who lives with her family in a shoebox. The doll family are owned by two sisters, Emily and Charlotte, and are very happy, except for one thing: they long for a proper home. To their delight, their wish comes true when Emily and Charlotte fix up a Victorian dolls’ house – just for them. It’s perfect. But then a new arrival starts to wreak havoc in the dolls’ house. For Marchpane might be a wonderfully beautiful doll, but she is also terribly cruel. And she always gets her own way . . .

“But what it is about is loyalty, betrayal, courage, vanity and folly, within a story as beautifully and finely worked as the tiny tapestry chairs the dolls sit on in their lovely new house. Their happiness is shattered by the arrival of one of the house’s original residents. Unlike Tottie, however, she is a very grand doll, made of kid and china and clothed in lace.” “Marchpane is a heavy, sweet, sticky stuff like almond icing,” explains Tottie to Apple. “You very quickly have enough of it. It was a good name for her.”

Marchpane drives a wedge between Emily, who wants to turn the whole house over to Marchpane and make the other dolls her servants, and the younger Charlotte, who struggles to articulate her sense of injustice until the tragedy of Birdie’s death reveals the truth.

“So you see, it’s not about dolls at all – it’s as neat a portrait of humanity as you could ever wish.” -Lucy Mangan, The Guardian

From the book by Rumer Godden

NEW WORK

Confederemix

Sandy Gibson & Mark MacDonald

Confederemix is kickin’ it really old school with a musical retelling of Canada’s birth as seen through the eyes of Anne Brown and her husband George, a lesser known Father of Confederation. The story is told and sung through a mash-up of contemporary songs and dramatic moments in Canadian history. It’s a bumpin’ new show that you don’t want to miss!

NEW WORK

Sparks Street Ballad: A Canadian Tale of Thomas D’Arcy McGee

Cynthia Sugars

From the producers of Gatineau River Reel and A Fiddlers’ History of Canada! History comes alive when Thomas D’Arcy McGee moves into Mrs. Trotter’s boarding house on Sparks Street. There to help forge a vision of Confederation, McGee is horrified to learn that his new lodgings are home to a boisterous group of young fiddlers who meet for their weekly practices. As he learns to appreciate their music and energy, the children offer McGee an important lesson about the real meaning of community. Blending history and fiction, music and drama, this play will have your toes tapping and heart singing.